Modern Science and Mozart

By January 17, 2011Music

Mozart and modern science make a formidable team.

According to the UK’s Guardian, when the sound waves from stereos playing operas likeThe Magic Flute” and “The Marriage of Figaro” are combined with oxygen, the activity of micro-organisms is increased and they are able to break down bio-solids more quickly.  This theory was first effectively tested by a German plant operator, Anton Stucki, who works at a sewage center just outside of Berlin.

“We think the secret is in the vibrations of the music, which penetrate everything – including the water, the sewage and the cells. It creates a certain resonance that stimulates the microbes and helps them to work better. We’re still in the test phase, but I’ve already noticed that the sewage breakdown is more efficient,” says Stucki.

He projects Mozart’s music in all different directions to simulate the sounds of a concert hall.  Stucki says that The Magic Flute gives him the best results and that in order for the process to work you need exactly the right type of music – it comes down to the harmony and frequencies.

Stucki thinks that Mozart managed to incorporate laws of nature into his music.  “It has an effect on people of every age and every cultural background. So why not on microbes? After all, they’re living organisms just like us.”

His plant expects to save about one thousand euros a month with this practice.

In other related news, Mozart’s music has an affect on the ripening speed of bananas.  A Japanese fruit company, Toyoka Chuo Seika, is contending that when its bananas are kept in “ripening chambers” that are filled with wall-to-wall music by Mozart, they taste better.

Apparently, Mozart’s “Piano Concerto 5 in D major,” and “String Quartet 17” get a lot of air time in the chambers, thereby increasing the sweetness of the fruit.  The company is selling their “Mozart Bananas” in supermarkets and the sales have gone up since their debut last July.

Who knew that Mozart’s music not only had an emotional affect on his listeners, but a scientific affect on the inanimate ones?

To read about other companies that believe in the power of Mozart over their products, click here.

Source: Guardian.co.uk

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